January 2012

January 29, 2012

Single Malt Whisky Flavor Map

Categories: Food and Drink

This map is a simple way to understand where the different single malts fall. I love it!

A-Guide-to-Flavours

From: malts.com

Some of the backstory of this map...

Posted January 29, 2012 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Kiteboarding at Double Bluff Beach

Categories: Photos

Chris Evans and I went to take photos of the crazy kiteboarders who were ripping it up on a very windy, chilly January day at Double Bluff Beach on Whidbey Island.

When we first arrived, there were only a few kiteboarders out, but there were a lot of guys setting up. The kites have inflatable leading edge and slats, so they were pumping up their kites and dealing with their lines.
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Pretty quickly there was a whole squadron out there, sailing in a big oval, maybe 45 degrees to the wind (close reach up, broad reach down).
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The wind was blowing steadily and hard, so they were getting a lot of speed.
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I was amazed how much air they were able to get using this speed.
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We were out there for about 45 minutes until we were too cold to keep shooting (even with gloves on). Although the kiteboarders were in dry suits and working hard, I have to believe they were pretty cold too. Still, it was awesome.
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Posted January 29, 2012 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

January 7, 2012

A Comparison of US vs. Chinese News Coverage: Pollution

Categories: China Random junk

I've written twice before, comparing Western and Chinese news coverage of the same story (Obama visit to China and Internet registration). In both cases, it was interesting to see how the reports read very differently despite presenting the same basic facts; differences in tone, emphasis, and inclusion/omission of other facts can really change how the story comes across.

AQI 493 from my office window

Today, I was reading about how Beijing will start reporting a new air pollution measure - PM 2.5 (2.5 micron particulate matter). I've written before several times about the gross Beijing air. We relied on the US Embassy's air quality Twitter feed that showed what we thought was a more accurate view of what we were seeing outside; Chinese official reports measured the larger PM10 particles and would say we were having only minor air pollution even when we couldn't see outside.

The report from China Daily acknowledges the dangers of PM2.5 and how the government is responding to "public criticism". They describe the effort as similar to what other cities in China have been doing and that the government is already taking action to clean up Beijing air. There is no mention of the US Embassy's Twitter feed. There is also a story (higher on the front page) describing how Beijing's PM 2.5 count is down. The story paints a picture of the government taking action and listening to the people. "Beijing to release PM 2.5 data".

The similar story from the New York Times described the actions as a response to "public outcry", "public's anger", and bloggers who "sharply criticized" the government. NYT puts a lot more emphasis on the effect of the US Embassy Twitter feed as well as mentioning how Twitter is blocked in China, and talks about the Chinese complained about the feed as "confusing" and "insulting". This story leaves the reader thinking the people are mad at the government and that the gov't needs outside pressure to change. "China to Release More Data on Air Pollution in Beijing".

Again, both of these stories seem factually correct, and perhaps the "right" interpretation is somewhere in the middle. You'll never know unless you read multiple news sources.

Posted January 7, 2012 | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

January 2, 2012

Get Fresher Eggs: Reading Egg Cartons

Categories: Food and Drink

To find the freshest eggs at the supermarket, you can decode the numbers on the carton. The number we’re looking for is the three digit number (circled in red below). This is the ordinal date (the day of the year) the eggs were packaged (so 1 is January 1, 2 is January 2, etc.) Assuming the eggs were all handled the same way, I think you can assume that eggs packaged more recently are fresher.

Egg carton codes

Interestingly, the “use by” by date (the month/day indicated on the carton) seems less reliable. These two cartons in my refrigerator have the same packing date yet the “use by” dates are more than a week apart. In my local grocery store, I’ve seen packaging dates more than three weeks apart on the shelf. While the eggs are probably all safe to eat, I’m confident there’s a big drop in quality between these eggs. (I look for how thick/runny the whites are.)

In case you’re curious, the Pxxxx number is the plant where the eggs were packed.

Posted January 2, 2012 | Permalink | Comments (53) | TrackBack (0)